Cottage History

Original Homestead
Original Homeplace - circa 1875
 
Over 160 years ago part of our family emigrated from Eversberg, Germany seeking political and economic freedom. They settled in a new land that reminded them of the Rhine Region of Germany. Another part of our German ancestry moved to the English colonies in the Carolinas during the early 1700s. Remembering the feudal society they had left, they were ardent supporters of the American Revolution. Over the years they moved west with the growing young Nation.
 
Albinus and Christina Frechmann emigrated to Canada in the 1830's and eventually moved to Vicksburg, MS where they bought and operated a small hotel. In the early 1840's they joined the Philadelphia German Settlement Society and purchased and farmed land outside Hermann in a rural area known as Stolpe. They later raised a son named Anton who farmed and also worked as a railroad engineer. Anton and his wife had several children including a son named Anthony.
 
Farming with Horses
Farming with Team of Horses - circa 1900
Planning for his own family, Anthony bought land down the road and built a smaller home for his own future family, known as the "Cottage". Like the house he grew up in, the Cottage is a German style stone house which took a single mason two years to build. Clementine's Cottage was completed in 1893 and is located on Indian Hill Farm just down the road from the Frechmann Homeplace. Before its completion, Anthony inherited the first home where his two children, Henry and Laura, were born and raised. Henry later inherited the orginal homestead which still exists but was handed down to another branch of the family and later sold.
 
Amelings Threshing Wheat
Walter and Laura Threshing Wheat - circa 1930
In 1911, Laura Frechmann, Anthony's daughter, married Walter Ameling. The couple purchased the farm where they farmed and raised their daughter Marie Clementine Warner. During this period the nature of farming was changing with the advent of mechanization. Walter was one of the first to replace horse power with the tractor. But falling crop prices also required small farmers to diversify. Walter harvested timber for railroad ties, raised dairy cattle and hogs, and was a local MFA insurance adjustor.
 
Walter Timbering
Turning Logs into Lumber and Railroad Ties
During the work week, farmers would get up before dawn, eat a little and then start work. About mid-morning food would be brought out to the fields to tide them over until they came back for a large lunch. At the end of the day they sat down for dinner. Consuming big meals was a necessity in the days of extremely hard labor. Farm women spent a hard day toiling over a hot wood stove.
 
Farming during the Depression and World War II was a family enterprise. All contributed to the farm's productivity and success. Before heading off to school, "Clementine" had cows to milk and eggs to gather. After school, she had to feed the chickens and again milk the cows. During the summer, there was a garden and orchard to tend. The work was hard but even in the worst of times they spent Sundays going to church and visiting their neighbors.
 
Visitors arriving in car
Sunday Visitors Calling
 
Food and drink have always been essential to Germans in their native country and for those who emigrated to America. In the Hermann area, townsfolk and farmfolk continued their heritage. Sunday was a day when friends and relatives attended church and went calling. Festivals, socials and weddings were always good reasons for enjoying meals together. They enjoyed what Germans called "gemuetlichkeit" - warm cordiality, comfortable friendliness, congeniality.
 
50th Anniversary Gathering
Charles and Clementine Ameling Celebrate 50th Anniversary
 
In the Hermann area many, if not all, homes had a barrel filled with home-made wine using skills brought from the old country. When Sunday visitors came by they enjoyed catching up on the latest news while enjoying a good glass of wine and dessert. In keeping with its German heritage, the Hermann area is fortunate to offer a rich variety of wines and beer that enhance fine food and good company.
 
We are fortunate not to do the hard labor of old, but we continue the tradition of gemuetlichkeit in food and drink. We enjoy dishes from old and new family recipes, many of which date from times in the early days of the German-American Hermann pioneers, updating them to make them as healthy as possible while keeping them tasty - ja, smeckt sehr gut!!
 
In keeping with its German heritage, the Hermann area is fortunate to offer a rich variety of wines and beer that enhance fine food and good company. In the Hermann area many if not all homes had a barrel filled with home-made wine using skills brought from the old country. When Sunday visitors came by they enjoyed catching up on the latest news while enjoying a good glass of wine and dessert.
 
Marie and Grandmother
Clementine Generations
 
The farm was passed down to Marie and later to Randy and Wynnette Warner. To recognize the German pioneer spirit, we have named the cottage "Clementine's Cottage" after Marie "Clementine" Warner and her grandmother, "Clementine" Gaebler Ameling whose father and uncles served with the Army during the Mexican War. They were discharged in New Mexico and like many of our Pioneers were drawn to the West. Adventuresome, they drove cattle to California three times during the 1849 gold rush when Darling Clementine became a popular American song. We suspect that they also panned for a little gold!
 
Clementine's Cottage was restored and is operated by Randy and Wynn, Jim and Aly Warner, with additional support from the latest Warner, Tori. Our goal is to provide our guests with a unique and enjoyable stay in the manner of German gemuetchlichkeit and hospitality! We hope to greet you with a hearty "Willkomen" soon!
 
Tori
Tori


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